PAI fights to keep women front and center. Read how in our 2019 annual report. Read More

Sylvian Musau tackles motherhood while helping youth in her community avoid unwanted pregnancy.

After learning about contraception from Kenya Muslim Youth Development Organization and its partners, Sylvian shares her story as a youth mentor.

Keep reading

PAI supports faith-based advocates to expand access to contraception and other family planning services.

When women and girls can decide if, when and how many children they want to have, they lead healthier lives and their families and communities thrive. Despite the progress that has been made, an estimated 214 million women in developing regions who want to prevent or delay pregnancy still face significant barriers to using modern contraceptive methods. In many of these countries, faith-based organizations are key providers of reproductive, maternal and newborn health care. Faith-based organizations that support family planning can bring a new perspective to policy discussions but are often under-resourced. PAI provides funding, strategic guidance and advocacy support to faith-based groups like Kenya Muslim Youth Development Organization that effectively advocate for quality family planning and reproductive health services in their communities.

An estimated 214 million women in developing regions who want to prevent or delay pregnancy face significant barriers to using modern contraceptive methods.

Countries


Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia


Over half of all sexually active adolescent girls in Kenya who want to delay pregnancy have an unmet need for modern contraception.

From Young Mother to Youth Mentor

Sylvian Musau didn’t know about family planning until she became unexpectedly pregnant at age 20. “I never knew how to face my parents because I saw that I was a failure — a disappointment.” For Sylvian, this concern went beyond her family: Adolescent pregnancy is considered shameful to her Jomvu community, one of the settlements in Mombasa county along the Kenyan coast.

Sylvian knew the judgment wouldn’t stop after giving birth. “So, you don’t know what choice to make,” she admits. “Do you abort, do you keep the child? How will you manage? How will you bring that child up?”

Over half of all sexually active adolescent girls in Kenya who want to delay pregnancy have an unmet need for modern contraception. While the national government has committed to reducing teenage pregnancy rates and released an adolescent sexual and reproductive health policy, the coastal region has been slower to make progress.

PAI grantee Kenya Muslim Youth Development Organization (KMYDO) is changing that by engaging with local government and health officials to address the lack of youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services and funding in the region. KMYDO is a national organization that inspires grassroots youth activism, strengthens community leadership and supports the growth of family planning advocacy.

During her pregnancy, Sylvian was connected with KMYDO and its community-based partner, the Pwani Youth Network (PYN). This is when PYN staff members taught her about family planning and women’s empowerment. Now as a new mother, Sylvian shares what she learned with young people in Mombasa county.

With support from PYN and KMYDO, Sylvian is teaching her peers how they can prevent pregnancy and HIV infection using contraceptives such as condoms. She also counsels young girls, connecting them to the nearest health clinic; and hosts family planning dialogues with youth groups and religious institutions in person and on social media.

By bringing her daughter Chelsea to events, Sylvian has shown her community what it means to be a young mother. She hopes that speaking openly about her experience will decrease the stigma she faced and also encourage young people to use family planning to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

Seeing her child growing gives Sylvian the “strength to go out there — speak, work and hustle.” In the future, she sees herself as an ambassador who will impact “not only the subcounty, but the whole of Kenya. Because there’s no greater feeling than helping a person who needs it.”

I never had knowledge about contraceptives. I never had a person to mentor or empower me … [Now,] I do share my story … Because there’s no greater feeling than helping a person who needs it.
Sylvian Musau, youth mentor

Join Us

Get Updates

Stay informed about the issues impacting sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Sign Up

Donate

Be a champion for women and girls around the world.

Support Our Work

Engage

Join the movement to advance the rights of women and girls.

Take Action